Flamenco Pot Collection

A hugely long-performing pot combination with the violas flowering much of winter, pierced through by tulips in spring. More
15 items 200829-15 £14.50 Delivery early October
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When in stock, please allow up to 2 weeks for delivery.
More Details

A hugely long-performing pot combination of spring 2018 and a favourite of mine and Josie's, the violas flowering much of winter, pierced through by tulips in spring.

This collection contains:
Genus Tulipa, Viola
Group/Species Parrot,

Cultivar with unusual fringed, curled and twisted petals. Mainly late-flowering. Stems of variable length with large flowers which can be bi-coloured. Click here for more information about tulip groups.

Single Late

Single-flowered cultivars, mainly long-stemmed and late-flowering. Versatile with large oval to almost squarish flowers on strong stems. Click here for more information about tulip groups.

Variety Blumex, Martin, Queen of Night
Type Hardy Perennial, Hardy Perennial Bulb (grown as a Hardy Annual)
Common Name Tulip, Viola
Border Position Container, Front, Middle
Soil Type Chalky, Clay, Fertile, Neutral, Sandy
Scent Unscented
Site Full Sun, Part Shade
Moisture Moist but Well-drained, Well-drained
Height 15-60cm (6-24in)
Sowing, Seeds, Planting Plant tulip bulbs outdoors from October to December, pointy end up 10-15cm (4-6in) deep, 8cm (3in) apart. Layer bulbs to a depth of 25-30cm (10-12in) if room is tight. Remember to add plenty of grit if your soil is heavy. For containers, space bulbs 1-2cm (½-1in) apart if planting in a single layer, give them more room, 2-3cm (1-1½in), if planting in a bulb lasagne. Violas look good edging a border or used to overplant spring bulbs which will happily push their way through.
Care Tips Don't plant tulip bulbs until the cold weather has set in – this helps wipe out viral and fungal diseases. Leave the browning foliage on your tulips until every leaf has died right down – this allows the bulb to store more food and increases the chances of good flowering the following year although most bedding-type (i.e. not species) tulips are best replaced each year. If left in the ground, they are unlikely to re-flower after their first year. Deadhead, or trim violas to prolong flowering into autumn and beware of slugs and aphids as both are fond of violas.
Flowering April - July
Vase Life Tulips make supreme cut flowers. Strip the bottom leaves, tie the stems in paper to hold them ramrod straight and leave to drink for at least 3 hours – or overnight. This helps keep the stems straight, but tulips do continue to grow after picking so curves may appear. If you prefer them bolt upright all the way through their cut flower life, poke a pin or darning needle through the stem, just below the flower and then remove the needle. This disrupts the very active area of cell division, where the main growth comes from after picking. The tulip then won’t develop a hanging head. I only do this with the whopper-headed varieties.
Harvesting Flower production: 3-4 months
Cooking Notes Viola flowers are edible, and are fantastic on top of a salad or as a cake decoration.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  • Sow Under Cover/Plant Indoors
  • Direct Sow/Plant Outdoors
  • Flowers/Harvest
Advice

We don't currently have additional advice on using / growing this particular product on our website, but if you do have a question that isn't answered on this page then please give us a call on 0345 092 0283 and we'll happily chat through any queries you may have, or email us on plantadvice@sarahraven.com (for advice on all things growing) or info@sarahraven.com for anything else.

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